Christ Forgave

It seems as though my blog posts have become about as commonplace as the Dallas Cowboys’ chances of winning the coveted Lombardi Trophy lately, apparently, I don’t manage my time very well (or as David Crowder’s Twitter account put it, manage myself around time effectively).  God has been working on my heart in so many different ways lately, it’s never a comfortable feeling when He does that, especially when He’s working on breaking down the areas of my life that I know I struggle with daily and don’t want to put a lot of effort into dealing with.  Our pastor asked me a while ago to preach on a Sunday night, and that was right in the middle of when God was wrecking shop on my heart on the subject of forgiveness.  So here we go!

When I read this one verse in the book of Luke, I see so much that I need to learn, so far I need to go, how much I need to grow in my relationship with Christ.  That one verse is Luke 23:34.  “Jesus said, ‘Father forgive them, they do not know what they are doing.’ And they divided up his clothes by casting lots.”

Now, we all know that Christ was a very humble and compassionate man.  We also know that he taught forgiveness during his years of ministry, so what makes this verse so profound to me?  Let us consider what all was going on during this time.  At this point in time, Christ was on the cross between the two criminals who were being crucified for crimes committed at an earlier date.  Prior to this, Christ had been through 4 separate trials and was flogged and beaten with a flagellum, had a crown of thorns smashed into his brow, was mocked and forced to carry his cross through the streets. Following that, his hands and feet were staked to the aforementioned cross.  With all of that in mind, also remember that Christ was sentenced to this predicament by Pilate at the requests of the Pharisees and the chosen nation of Israel.  For Christ to ask his Father to forgive them, to us, is crazy talk.  Not only did he forgive them at that moment, but his death upon that cross was for their sins, as well as for everyone’s sins.

How many of us could say that we could forgive in that situation?  How about in

  • Forgiving a disobedient child?
  • A spiteful neighbor?
  • A schoolyard bully?
  • A betraying friend?
  • An entire nation, of people you love, trying to kill you?
  • A friend denying they knew you, even after they swore up and down they wouldn’t and couldn’t?

Christ could, and did.

The closest we come to seeing Christ not go through with his crucifixion and death is in Luke 22:42.  He is praying in the garden and asks God to take the cup if it is His will.  What we see is Christ asking God to let him have a pass on this one if it was in His Divine Will, but if not, then let His will be done.  Christ wasn’t questioning God here, he was simply asking if the possibility existed for another way to grant us forgiveness for our sins, and if there wasn’t, then he was willing to proceed with what the Father was asking.  He put his personal comfort and preferences aside, and was obedient all the way to his death on the cross.  If he can do this, and not question the reason, who are we not to forgive without questioning?

As Christians, we sometimes like to have a bit of a double standard when it comes to forgiveness.  I’ve seen the saying “I’m not perfect, I’m forgiven” on bumper stickers, T-Shirts and banners everywhere, as well as heard and said it myself many times.  How is this saying in any way glorifying or honoring God?  It makes us feel okay about ourselves when we get caught in our own sin, but shows the world that we feel like it’s okay for us to sin because we’ve got our “fire insurance.”  I cringe every time I hear or see that phrase now, because of how much leverage it gives those who despise Christ and are looking for a reason to not believe in him.  We are called to accept that accountability when we sin, and repent and apologize to those we have led astray, or cast doubt into their hearts.  We have to flee from that pride that doesn’t allow us to grow.

Another area I struggle with, and I see other fellow believers struggling in, is feeling like a person is “too far gone” to be redeemed.  The recent shootings in Colorado brought about two ugly sides of humanity.  The shooting, and murder of so many people is one side of the ugliness.  The other is the fact that so many people, even believers, were so quick to condemn this man to Hell (something we have no business doing).  I was convicted by the enormous amount of people that were so publicly calling for his demise, once again, many of these people were believers.  In our carnal minds, we can’t get past the fact that this man killed people, so he deserves to die right now.  My heart was, uncharacteristically for me, sympathetic for this man to know Christ.  Upon vocalizing my feeling on this subject, I received mixed replies from believers and atheists both.  I do enjoy the occasional debate, and this turned into just that.  I feel as though, even for a murderer such as Holmes, until a person has died, we should desire to share the love of Christ with that person, so that they may have the chance to have salvation through Christ’s sacrifice.  Some responded with the same feeling, some were undecided, and some were adamantly against this thought.  If we look at the teachings of Christ, his example shows us that no one is exempt from the forgiveness through his death.  How are we honoring and glorifying God through our condemnation of a person who has sinned?

Are we showing the characteristics of forgiveness and love by defending a right to free speech?  I’m reminded of the situation that arose with Chick-fil-a after founder and CEO of the company was asked about his views on marriage.  His response was not derogatory or inflammatory in any manner or fashion, but he was attacked, however unfairly, by the media along with other special interest groups.  As a result of his response to the question, his company lost toy endorsements for kid’s meals, and endured countless character attacks because of his stance that marriage should remain defined as between a man and a woman.  Upon this reaction, Gov. Mike Huckabee, who is known for his conservative and Christian beliefs, organized “Chick-fil-a Appreciation Day” for August 1st. He encouraged all of those who supported traditional marriage to eat at Chick-fil-a as a response to the attacks on freedom for Dan T. Cathy to express his beliefs and convictions about this subject.  This idea, in theory, was a good one.  However, it quickly became a Christians vs. Sinners fast food theme day.  Not all people who were eating at the fast food restaurant were going with the mindset to be pointing a finger at those who were homosexual or supported same-sex marriage, but those who were going with that intention turned the event into another reason for people to call Christians, as a whole, bigots and hatemongers among other things.  My question through all of this situation is, are we showing the love and compassion of Christ through taking this type of stand?

Are we loving them for their public sin as Christ loves us for our private sins?  Homosexuality is such a hot topic lately, not only because of the media attention from Chick-fil-a, but also because it has been such a battle for Christians to express their beliefs on the matter.  As a Christian, I believe marriage is to be between a man and a woman, no other way, this was the example defined in Genesis.  The bible also refers to homosexuality as an abomination, and defines it as a sin several times throughout the Old and New Testaments.  One of the most prominent references is Romans 1:18-32, and this has been a verse that has caused many debates between myself and others who don’t see things the way scripture teaches.  Simply because homosexuality is a sin, should we hold that sin to a higher level of punishment or seriousness?  Some would argue yes, that it is a lifestyle and that is why it is worse than having a bad temper or using profanity.  I argue that sin such as a bad temper or pride is a lifestyle as well.  We, in our carnal minds, can’t look at sin the same way God does.  We want to categorize it as our justice system does, and put it on a scale.  Romans 3:23 tells us that we all sin, and Romans 6:23 tells us that the consequence for that sin is eternal death.  How can we honor and glorify God if we categorize sin?  How can we honor and glorify Him if we can’t forgive people for their sins and understand their need for salvation, as we needed it too?  The short answer is, we can’t.  We have to be able to put ourselves, as close as we can, into Christ’s mindset and love beyond human fallibility.

Too many people have been “won” by saying a prayer that was prayed out of guilt, overt pressure, peer pressure or a sense of security.  If that prayer was prayed out of insincerity, or there wasn’t a heart change, can we really expect that person’s life to have been changed?  No one knows if a person has truly made that change with the exception of them and the Lord.  One thing is for sure though, if we led that person in a prayer that they didn’t understand, or gave them a false sense of understanding of salvation, we are as accountable for that as we are for the person we pushed away because of their sin?  Their sin is their own, we are called to share the Gospel with them regardless of whether or not we think they deserve the grace we didn’t and still don’t deserve.

We are called to hold other believers accountable for sins, not overlooking our own sins first, in a loving and Christ-like way.  We also like to point out that Christ went into the temple and kicked out the merchants and livestock in righteous indignation, which he did.  Those people that got kicked out of the temple knew better than to be doing what they were doing.  They were knowingly doing things dishonestly inside the temple, and that is why Christ went in and wrecked shop. They had made the temple a place of disgrace and business, instead of a place of worship.  Can we expect a non-believer to automatically know the standards of the bible?  Can we expect them to jump right along and be perfect the first time they are informed of sin?

How soon after your salvation experience did you get everything lined up perfect and quit sinning?  Still working on it?  Yeah, me too.  I’ve been a believer for 20 years now, and I’m still one of the biggest busts when it comes to evaluating salvation expectations met.  If ESPN had one of their Top 10 lists of salvation busts, I’d have to be pretty high up, if not the top guy, and I’ve been at this for more than half my life.  How can we expect a non-believer to just know what sin is?  Our culture isn’t telling him or her what sin is, in fact, they are being informed just the opposite of what biblical standards are for right and wrong.  I liken this concept to parenting.  You parents will appreciate this, I just know it!  How many times did you have to, or have you told your child not to run in the house?  Did they listen the first time?  How about the 2nd?  Did the third, fourth, or fifth time do the trick?  My 5-year-old is still figuring out this one, and I’m pretty sure we’re on number 4,543 for the “DON’T RUN” warning system.  Sometimes it takes kids a long time to figure out they need to obey.  To do this, they have to first go against their selfish human nature they are born with, then, they have to have a clear understanding of why the issue is wrong.  The same applies to us and sin, especially when the surrounding culture condones and approves of sin and tells us it is perfectly normal and acceptable.  That being said, what sin(s) do you struggle with daily?  How easy is it for you to avoid that sin?  The only reason I ask, is because I deal with stuff EVERY SINGLE DAY!  We all do, Paul says that there is no sin that is uncommon to man, and it’s true- we all deal with sin every day, even if we won’t admit it.  What’s the most effective way for you to learn how to move past that sin and grow in the right direction?  Is it with someone continually reminding you of that sin and hammering into your psyche that you are a mess up?  Or is it with someone who encourages you and loves you, and corrects in a loving way?  If we’re talking about my kids, it’s going to be the latter.  If I stand in the doorway of their rooms, threatening to spank them for not cleaning their rooms, you can guarantee a meltdown is on the way.  Part of the meltdown is that we’ll be fighting all night to get 6 blocks picked up off the floor.  The nights that the spoon collects dust, and I get on the floor and help pick up some of those blocks and clothes, and encourage my kids, the room takes no time to get clean.  If we have the spirit of love and forgiveness with new believers, non-believers, and fellow believers, how much more can we help grow and strengthen each other in our walks?

None of what I’m teaching about, or talking about has to do with tolerance or acceptance of sin, by any means, because Christ did not teach that.  He taught tolerance and acceptance of the sinner, which is US! Think about that. He accepted us. You. Me. Everyone.  Can we have friendships with those that our convictions don’t match up to?  Certainly, but we have to let our convictions be known from the start, so we aren’t deceptive in our friendship with them about those things.  Is it our responsibility to share the Gospel with them?  Most definitely.  Is it our place to change their minds about Christ and salvation?  Nope.  Well, if not us, then whose place is it to change their minds?  It is the Holy Spirit’s place, yet we are called to plant the seed into the hearts of people.  When that seed germinates, we are called to nurture that seed to maturity.  The seed we plant has to emerge, or germinate from that hard shell, and the Holy Spirit causes that emergence.  The non-believer becomes a believer, the spiritually dead heart emerges and begins new life.  After that emergence, we begin the process of nurturing, which is discipleship.  We don’t just pray and leave it there with them on their own. As a gardener constantly waters and feeds his plants, we must also constantly water and feed the new believer.  We will fail this process if we cannot have a forgiving heart and accept that they will not be perfect from the word “Go!”.  Christ understands and knows that we all will continually mess up daily, but he also knows that his death on the cross covered that mess up.

So when we look at Luke 23:34, we know that Christ was showing yet another example for us to follow.  No matter what a person does, no matter what they think, no matter what they say, we are to forgive, because Christ did.  He forgave without discretion, and in order for us to glorify and honor our Father, we must forgive without discretion.  Nothing else matters, because when it’s all said and done, Christ Forgave.

Worship Part II

Wow, ok, it’s been a loooooong time since I’ve really updated anything on here, actually, just a hair over 2 months.  As with most of you, the past two months have been a time of growth, emotionally, spiritually, and yes…physically : (  Something about the holidays just makes me hungry, and this year the hunger never left me…

So, in light of the areas of growth, I will be continuing on with the Worship Series on the topic of social worship.

How many of you have participated in watching an awards show this year?  Go ahead, admit it, I won’t tell anyone.  How many times during those awards shows did you find yourself critiquing the people our society tells us are glamorous, sexy and should be viewed as role models?  Where in scripture are we commanded or even suggested to spend so much time idolizing another human?  As scripture tells us “there is none righteous, not one.”  Where do we get that it’s okay to put these people, who are as flawed and sinful as we are, up on a pedestal?  Our worship of people in our society is not even remotely a new concept.  People have been idolizing other people since Adam and Eve got kicked out of the Garden of Eden, and it’s gotten nothing but worse since then.  In my own life, I have idolized athletes, pastors, friends even fellow classmates throughout school.  As I’ve gotten older, I’ve looked back with embarrassment at some of the things I’ve done and some of the ways I’d idolized people.  Don’t get me wrong, there’s nothing wrong with looking up to someone or having a role model that you refer to when going through something you’re not quite sure how to handle.  What I’m saying is that when we put so much attention, so much thought into considering what that person would do, that we mimic them completely as if to try and become that person, we lose sight of what we are called to do.  The only one we are supposed to idolize is Jesus Christ.  End of story.

Along with the dangers of mimicking these people  in everything we do, we run the risk of leading others astray from what God has called them to do. Luke 17:1-2 talks about leading others astray:

1 He said to His disciples, “Offenses will certainly come, but woe to the one they come through! 2 It would be better for him if a millstone were hung around his neck and he were thrown into the sea than for him to cause one of these little ones to stumble.” (HCSB)

If I as a parent spend hours upon hours watching football film and don’t spend time with my kids, what does that show my kids?  Not that I care about them as much as I care about watching football, my attention and focus is on that film instead of with them, therefore showing that my attention is on something other than them.  When we spend more time worshiping movie stars, music icons and other social royalty instead of spending time with our Savior and King, we will never grow to the potential that we have in Christ.  My encouragement to myself and to you guys is to monitor what you spend the majority of your time on, and see if we can work our way to spending more time with our Savior through reading scripture and prayer instead of with trivial reality shows that encourage and condone hatred and spitefulness.

I will hopefully be a little more consistent with this thing from now on, just working on getting a routine figured out that will allow for more type time, as it is a source of stress relief for me, and hopefully a time of some form of entertainment for you.  Thanks, and as always, I look forward to and enjoy any feedback I get on this blog!

Phillip   <><

 

Missed Worship Part I? Read it here

Worship: Part I

Worship.  The context of the word varies greatly from culture to culture, religion to religion, and generation to generation.  I took the liberty of looking up the definition of worship on the Merriam-Webster website, and this is what it had to say worship meant:

As a noun-

1

chiefly British : a person of importance —used as a title for various officials (as magistrates and some mayors)

2
: reverence offered a divine being or supernatural power; also : an act of expressing such reverence
3
: a form of religious practice with its creed and ritual
4
: extravagant respect or admiration for or devotion to an object of esteem <worship of the dollar>
As a verb-
1
: to honor or reverence as a divine being or supernatural power
2
: to regard with great or extravagant respect, honor, or devotion <a celebrity worshipped by her fans>
I find it incredibly interesting that in both forms of the word, the examples the dictionary used were for very surface level things.  One was worship of the dollar, and the other of a celebrity.  Kinda points to the foremost thoughts of our culture as Americans, doesn’t it?  This series will probably get some of you to raise an eyebrow and wonder “what in the world is this guy talking about,” and for others it may be an opportunity to see things through the eyes of a guy who was raised in church and has seen the good, the bad, and the horror of this thing we call religion.  Some of you who may read this may be familiar with how we have seriously mangled what worship is intended to be, and some may not have even thought about it before.  My intentions with anything I type in here are, as always, not intended to create dissent or to bash on the church, they are simply to help me and others to grow and learn.  I realize that some of my prior posts haven’t been the most positive things to read, but I do try to keep an honest and objective point-of-view, especially since I know that I’m nowhere near the perfect example of what a Christian is supposed to look like, sound like, behave like, and just be like in general.  With all that mess in mind, let’s begin!
Worship, to many, is the attention we give the object(s) of our desire and focus in life.  One needs not to look long at the corporate sector of our country to see that the dollar is an object of affection for many.  Another example, would be the attention we give to celebrities and dignitaries.  The main thing I can see pointing people in the direction of materialistic worship, is  the lack of Christ in culture and life.  The current president of our country made a comment that “We no longer consider ourselves a Christian nation…”  As much as has been made of this quote by the president, I think he inadvertently hit the proverbial nail on the head with this statement.  He meant the comment to promote religious diversity in our country, which there definitely is, but I agree that we can no longer consider ourselves as a Christian nation.  If you take a step back and look, at what our nation’s focus is on, you cannot honestly say we are a Christian nation.  When the majority of our nation makes the dollar, celebrities who live in and promote a sinful lifestyle the focus, we cannot say that Christ is the center of our nation.  The very label “Christian” implies that one is a follower of Christ, a “little-Christ” if you will.  There are areas and groups of people in our country that are definitely focused on following Christ, and that rebuke those who claim Christ but live directly and intentionally in darkness.  What does this paragraph have to do with worship?  Keep reading…
The only reason I used the president’s quote was to give a litmus of our nation’s status, not to begin a political firestorm, as I’ve really begun to separate myself from politics as much as I possibly can.  To determine what worship is, what it’s supposed to look like, what it’s supposed to sound like, we have to go to scripture.  All throughout the Old Testament, people worshiped God through sacrifice for sins, through praising Him for provision, protection, wisdom, etc.  This, with the exception of sacrifice of animals, still held true throughout the New Testament.  Worship in Biblical times was a lifestyle lived out through giving praise to God and to Christ for our salvation and His grace and mercy.  Too often we have substituted that lifestyle for just Sunday morning, Sunday evening, and Wednesday night programs and corporate fellowship.  The church has become a club that we attend so we can be counted on the roll and noted as “being there,” as opposed to the intention of a gathering of believers to praise THE Almighty God in recognition of the grace we have in our lives because of His great love for us.  I really have to think that if Paul came to any one of our churches nowadays, he would be like Christ in the temple, tossing over tables and saying “What are you guys doing?!?!?!?!”  Since when does praising our creator get limited to learning about the stories in scripture by coloring pictures and gluing animals to a paper ark, and then going to “big church?”  When we get to “big church,” we sit for a few minutes, maybe make some rounds saying our howdy’s and shaking a few hands.  Then, we have the introduction and announcements, followed by some hymns/contemporary songs that we either sing or don’t sing, based on our preferences on music, then we have a pastor come and deliver the Words that have been laid on his heart by the Lord.  After that, we have an invitation/alter call where people can come down and pray with the pastor or at the steps in front of the stage about things God has spoken to them about.  Then, we all shake hands, say a prayer and go eat lunch and take a nap.  Where in here is worship?
I’ve been a born again Christian for almost 20 years now, and I can almost count on two hands the times that I have truly felt the Spirit of God in worship on Sunday mornings.  How sad is that?  Some will attribute this, and sometimes rightfully so, to the lack of focus on my part to be included in the Spirit moving.  Others will attribute this, and sometimes rightfully so as well, to the lack of focus on those who are leading the body of believers in corporate worship.  The example of worship that we are to follow is lined out for us in Romans 12:1.
“Therefore, brothers, by the mercies of God, I urge you to present your bodies as a living sacrifice, holy and pleasing to God; this is your spiritual worship.”
We don’t attend church to “get something out” of the message brought by the pastor, the Bible is not for our benefit.  That’s right, you read correctly.  Our pastor made this statement several months ago, and it really got me to thinking about how I had always looked at scripture.  To be honest, it really brought about a totally different perspective on how I need to be reading scripture.  The Bible is not for our benefit, it is for the Glorification of God!  What does this mean?
It doesn’t matter how much music we play or sing, how many programs or activities we organize, how great our choir sounds, how many people we attract because we have such a cool “worship experience,” if our hearts are not tuned into where God is leading us, it is all for naught. If we are not seeking to bring glory to the One who has created us and given us life through His son’s sacrifice, we are nothing but noisy busy-bodies.  I will be taking apart different aspects of our culture’s view of worship as churches and as a society throughout this series.  I have no idea how long it will go on, but I hope you’ll join me for the duration, as well as adding some feedback and opinions along the way.  I always invite any differing opinions on things I say, as it provides a way for me to learn more, and possibly have my perspective changed.  Thanks, and I look forward to continuing this series!
Phillip

The Worship Series Prequel Part ii

Ok, so it was brought to my attention that maybe I should post an open ended question without a poll so that anyone who would like to can leave their opinion and feedback and not be limited to my answer choices.  So, here goes…again…

 

What is worship to you?  Leave an answer on the blog for further discussion, and all that good stuff!  Thanks!

Part 1 of the 3 Deadly C’s of Today’s Church

It has been a bit of time since I’ve updated the blog, seems everytime I get it updated and get ready to post again, life gets itself into a huge busy mess and the blog takes a backseat to the aforementioned life.  So, naturally, since it’s been over a month, there is a lot to update and share.  This is the start of a 3 part series that will have my point of view about conformity, compassion and the corporate mindset of the modern church.  So sit down and buckle in as I spend some time with some things that have been on my heart for a good while.

The first issue I would like to discuss is about conformity.  Everywhere we look in our modern day culture we see the effects of conformity.  From federal laws to entertainment, from school policies to church structure and operation.  Throughout scripture, we are given the example of how to live, how to love, and how to fellowship as a body of believers.  So many times people in our country want to tell the church how to exist, what to say, and what is ok to preach.  The sad thing is, that many churches are falling into the mindset that the only way to get people in the door is to fall in line and just make everyone happy by preaching and teaching what I call “fluffy bunnies and butterfly theology.”  We conform to the point of telling people that Hell is a figurative place, and that a loving God would never send people to a place of screaming, fire, and pure misery.  Well, they are partially right about that, as it’s been said before, God doesn’t send people to Hell, people send people to Hell.  You may be asking what on earth am I talking about.  God created us to worship and glorify Him, but we were also given free will to choose how we will live our lives.  When we choose sin, as Adam and Eve did in the garden, we choose a punishment of death.  Hell is a very real place, people who think that it is not are misleading and misinforming.  It is an unsettling and unfortunate trend to see how many churches are turning toward that mindset.  The only way to avoid this punishment is to believe in your heart and confess with your mouth that Christ is Lord and that He was raised from the dead.  Period.  No exceptions.  You can’t be good enough as Jehova’s Witnesses and Mormon’s would have you believe, you can’t have salvation because you were baptized as a baby, and salvation doesn’t come just because you were baptized.  “For it is by grace you have been saved, through faith-and this not from yourselves, it is the gift, of God-not by works, so that no one can boast.”  Ephesians 2:8-9, these verses spell it out exactly.  When churches won’t even speak the name of Jesus, but instead want to preach about how coming to church and singing songs and having a dandy time are what saves you, we have conformed.  These are the churches who experience exponential growth in short periods.  Joel Osteen is an example of a pastor at a church who has said that Christ is not the only way to Heaven, and in his sermons has said that if you are a christian, you were not meant to live a hard life.  This is what we call the gospel of prosperity, and he has a following of about 6000 members in his church as well as several book deals and televised services each week.  Now, if his ministry was founded on Christ being the only way to heaven, do you think he would be as successful as he is now?  I believe that he would not, and let me explain why I feel this way.  The gospel of Christ will turn some away.  Paul writes about this in 1 Corinthians 1:18-19, “The message of the cross is foolishness to those who are perishing, but to us who are being saved it is the power of God. For it is written: ‘I will destroy the wisdom of the wise; the intelligence of the intelligent I will frustrate.'”

The thing that these ministries overlook is a pretty big thing; the teachings of Christ.  They like to point out that Christ was compassionate, but they overlook the fact that Christ also kept those who followed Him and believed in Him accountable.  Accountability is something that I see a huge lack of in many of today’s mega-churches.  These churches a lot of times will have small groups that meet throughout the week, but I see the facebook status updates and pictures of those people who were at their small groups on Tuesday, out bar hoppin’ on Thursday and Saturday nights.  Now, before you all start saying “Phillip, are you casting stones?,” let me say that I have no right to judge, but I do have a responsibility to hold those who claim to be believers accountable as Christ did, and I expect no different from those who are believers to hold me accountable when they see me living contrary to the Gospel I proclaim.  The conformity we see now is that of our culture’s norms.  We are urged by Paul, as was the Roman church, to offer our bodies as living sacrifices.  This means to die for the glory of God every day, everywhere, and in everything.  The next part of that verse is to consider that Paul says not to be conformed to the patterns of this world, but to be transformed by the renewing of our minds.  What does it mean to be transformed by the renewing of our minds?  We are born with a sin nature, anyone who has kids can tell you that we are born sinful.  Our minds are not focused on what God has for us and we are not trained to look for His guidance in our lives from the time we are born.  We have to be shown, or led to the knowledge of who Christ is, and only when we give ourselves to Him and choose to believe and know that He died for our sins. Once that happens, our minds can be renewed, and then and only then we can discern what His good, pleasing, and perfect will is for our lives.  So, in summation, when we have true salvation in Christ, we will not conform to what our culture says is ok, we will choose to look to the cross for our guidance and wisdom instead of that which comes from our peers.

I know this is a potentially controversial topic in many areas, but the fact of the matter is that it shouldn’t be.  Scripture is very clear about how we are to live our lives, when we decide we don’t like what scripture says, or that we want to pick and choose scripture that meets our needs for each different situation, we are putting God in a box and trying to make Him our pet.  God is God, He is all-powerful, almighty, and we will have no idea what His plans are for our lives unless we seek Him continually and wholeheartedly.

I will be releasing the last two segments of this series within the next week to two weeks, and be sure to be reading because there will be a CD giveaway contained in one of the posts.  Thanks, and God Bless!

Phillip

“Staying true to self” and all the dangers within this mindset

So the last time I updated this was two weeks ago, and as usual, a ton has happened in two weeks.  My baby sister, and twin cousins of triplet birth have started college in San Angelo, Texas, the local 6-man football team has started its season off well, and looks to go 3-0 this Friday night.  My amazing wife, who also happens to be an extremely talented and gifted photographer, has seen a pretty drastic upswing in business, and that accounts for the lack of blog updating as my fingers are too clumsy and wide to update via the iphone app I have.  Our 4-month old son, Levi just had his 4 month checkup today, and is 16lbs 4oz and 26″, pretty much growing a lot, and has broken two teeth through on his bottom gum.  So therefore, I am behind on updating this thing.  The last blog I wrote was on a subject that is fast approaching becoming one of the top foci of the ministry we are involved in at the church we attend.  The topic I will be blogging about today, is a direct descendant of the lack of discipleship in the family and is a product of our sin-filled culture.  So here we go!

“Just be true to yourself, and don’t care about what anyone else has to say or think!” “Imma do me, and dat’s dat!”  “As long as you stay who you are, it doesn’t matter.”  These are some of the phrases I hear a lot from the members of my generation as well as members of the generation after me, with regards to how to live their lives in adverse situations.  Every time I hear these statements and those similar to it, I cringe from the glaring lack of wisdom contained in such commonly adhered-to advice.  If we measure these up to the standards of scripture, we see where they were, and are destined to fail when put into practice.  An example begins in Romans 3:10 where Paul writes “As it is written: There is no one righteous, not even one;” the next part that follows that is 3:23 of Romans “for all have sinned and fall short of the glory of God.”  Sin is the separation of us from God, He cannot look at sin, and definitely cannot have sin with Him in heaven.  When we have the salvation of Christ’s sacrifice and His blood to intercede for us, our sin becomes forgiven, therefore giving us access to the Father.  With that said, we are born sinful, no one is born without being capable of sin, nor is there anyone who will be able to live without sin in their lives.  So many times I hear people asking “Well, what does your heart tell you?”  Keep in mind Jeremiah 17:9 “The heart is deceitful above all things and beyond cure.  Who can understand it?”  When we put our trust into our hearts, and into trying to be true to ourselves, what are we putting our faith in?  Something that is born to do what is opposite of God’s will.  When we are true to ourselves, we are true to our sin.  When we trust what our heart is saying, it’s like saying we’re enjoying the show on a TV screen with nothing but white static and fuzzy noise.  Chaos seems to be a general way of life for so many people because of this, and impulsive decisions made because of this guidance, end up leading to further confusion, and a lot of times end with an individual asking God “Why?”  The first thing to note here, is that if a person is a true believer, there will be no need for them to try and be true to themselves, or seek wisdom from his or her heart, a believer seeks wisdom through prayer.  The chaos that a person feels won’t generally be on the outside, a great deal of the time, this person has things together from the outward appearance.  Nice house, nice cars, good job, good family, pretty much the American Dream syndrome.  While having those things isn’t a bad thing, or even a sin, the condition of that person’s spiritual life may be a huge battlefield, trying to decide whose side to fight on, God’s or the world’s.  Lately, by the standards of our culture and the fruits of the “christians” in our culture, it seems as though Satan may have the upper hand in our country.  I see so many people claim Christ, but are living that lie that John talks about in 1 John ch. 1-2.  We seem to have such a love of what the world has to offer because it is either easier, or makes us feel better when we have tons of stuff.  This is contradictory to 1 John 2:15-17 “Do not love the world or anything in the world.  If anyone loves the world, the love of the Father is not in him.  For everything in the world-the cravings of sinful man, the lust of his eyes and the boasting of what he has and does-comes not from the Father but from the world.  The world and its desires pass away, but the man who does the will of God lives forever.”  This scripture isn’t saying that we will live on this earth forever, but that our lives, when we live for our heavenly Father, we will live eternally with Him after our time here is done.  The lack of believers to live against the ways of the world has led to this lifestyle.  There is another common theme that I’m seeing more and more every day, and that is the thought that “love wins, and we’ll all go to heaven because God wouldn’t send people to a place like Hell.”  This scares me the most, as there are more and more churches starting to conform to the ways that our society thinks they should be.  Granted, our churches should never turn someone away from coming into the doors to hear about God and His love for us, but when we water the Gospel down to say that everyone will go to heaven, despite their religious beliefs, their sexual orientation, their desire to live in as much sin as possible, we are sending them to Hell with a house-warming gift.  Our society believes that teaching the Gospel of Christ, the standards of God’s Word, are hate crimes, and our churches just shrug their collective shoulders and say “well, I guess we just won’t teach that anymore.”  That is where we have gone wrong, because we have let our society dictate which part of the Gospel is shared, and which standards are upheld, based on the opinions of what the world thinks are acceptable.  Christ loves sinners, hung out with them throughout scripture, but not once did He say it was okay to continue to live in sin, especially to continue to knowingly pursue selfish fleshly desires.  When the world doesn’t like the standards outlined in scripture, and tries to pick and choose what they like to support their views, scripture gets skewed and misunderstood.  This is happening more than people ever want to admit, and is not profitable to the sharing of the Gospel of Christ.  One area that I personally have had to step away from in my life, is politics.  I used to listen to talk radio every day on the way to and from work, watch all the political tickers, catch political shows, and thought I had it all figured out.  When I stepped back and thought about it, the world does not have the interests of God in mind when they make decisions, even many of those who say they are running on their “faith.”  This fact, combined with the attitude that politics bring on, has led me to step back and away from that particular arena.  Maybe one day I’ll find a good balance in things, but as of now, not so much.

In summation, if we truly want to live as Christ did, we have to love, encourage, and share the Gospel of Christ.  When we pursue our heart’s desire, we become led astray as a sheep to the slaughter.  My encouragement to anyone who reads this, is to sit down and read 1 John, and understand the difference between darkness and light in the spiritual sense, and determine where God is leading you by spending time in prayer and seeking Godly counsel.

Am I missing the wedding banquet?

Howdy!  As I’ve been in the thinking-mode for the past several months, there is something that’s stuck out in my mind as being an incredibly scary thought.  How many of our friends, family, fellow church-goers, and people in general, who claim to know Christ don’t really know Him?  One of the illustrations that Christ used to show this, even back when He was in the flesh, was the Parable of the Wedding Banquet.

Found in the Gospel of Matthew chapter 22, Christ gives the Pharisees, priests, and church-goers an example of what many of them were doing in their lives.  His description of a king preparing a huge wedding banquet and sending out his servants to deliver the invitations, brings to mind the invitation of God for us to join Him in His kingdom, eternally.  The description that follows that is also eerily similar to the rejection of God throughout scripture and our culture.  So many times in history, the prophets sent by God were killed, persecuted, and tortured because of the message they brought forth.  The intended audiences rejected the words of the prophet, many times because of the lack of desire to be accountable for the lifestyles being lived.  As we continue on, we see the king sending servants out again to invite more guests, but again, the invitation is rejected, and the servants killed, tortured, and captured.  At this point, the king then sent his army and destroyed the murderers and destroyed their city.  I can’t help but draw a comparison to the same scenario that occurred with Noah in Genesis chapter 6.  Man had become corrupt, sinful, and in general disregard for God and His commands.  Noah, instructed by God, built the ark and God wiped out all mankind, with the exception of Noah and his family.  Crazy huh?  The next part of the parable has the servants of the king going out to every street corner and inviting anyone who they found to come to the banquet for his son’s wedding, both good and bad people.  When the king entered the hall, he saw a man who was not dressed appropriately for the event, and asked him “how did you get in here without wedding clothes?”  The man had no response, and the king had him bound and thrown into the darkness where there would be weeping and gnashing of teeth.  The point of this story is summed up in the final verse of the parable “For many are invited, but few are chosen.”

What’s the explanation?  Well, to begin with, the invitation to the wedding banquet symbolizes the invitation to salvation through Christ alone.  Everyone has an invitation to the banquet, good, bad, nice, mean, everyone has the invitation.  When we accept the invitation, there are a few things we have to do.  One thing is to let our lives be representative of Christ in our hearts, this is symbolized by the wedding clothes.  When we truly submit to Christ as our savior, we change our lives completely.  There is no remnant of our old lives, and our lives exemplify Christ in all that we do.  Does this mean we will be without sin?  Certainly not, but we will strive to change those things about us that cause us to sin, and cause others to sin as well.  There are so many people who claim to be a christian, but their lives reflect nothing of Christ.  I would like to think that everyone I go to church with is going to be dressed for the banquet, but the sad fact of this, is that there will be at least one or a few that thought they were dressed, but weren’t.  I would like to think that everyone in my family is going to be dressed for the banquet with me, again, I have family who doesn’t know the Lord from the guy down the street.  When Christ says “for many are invited, but few are chosen,” he is not speaking of people being called to ministry, as this verse has been misquoted as meaning so many times, or as the “elect” as it is also used.  It means that there will be people at the gates of Heaven who thought they were saved, thought they were christians, but weren’t dressed for the banquet.  They prayed a prayer, but never made the change in their lives, and never lived the example of Christ.  My encouragement, to anyone who reads this, is evaluate where you are, have you truly surrendered to His will for your life?  Feel free to inbox me after you read this with questions, comments, etc, and any feedback on the blog itself is also encouraged.